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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
's deputy police commissioner, paul brown who joins us live right now. mr. brown, congratulations. how have you done it? >> thank you mainly through 35,000 men and women in uniform but particularly through something called operation at attack where we send as many uniformed police officers as possible into areas where we have seen spikes and violence particularly shootings. >> that sounds almost like a back to basics campaign. why was the decision taken to go in that direction? >> well, it started with mayor bloomberg and commissioner kelly coming into the office right after 9/11 with a deep downturn in the economy, less tax revenue. we lost 6000 police officers through attrition, we have 6000 fewer now than we had then. that forced us to take a look at how we deploy officers into the city. instead of dividing them up as we usually did into 76 precincts, we focused better on defining exactly where the most violent crimes were happening and putting the biggest number of officers there, the biggest bang for the block. new recruits coming out of the police academy, they all went there. they al
scott brown who lost his seat to elizabeth warren in the november elections. >>> thank you so much for watching "state of the union." have a safe holiday season. i'm candy crowley in washington. head to cnn.com/sotu for extras. for all of us at state of the union, again, we want to wish you a merry christmas and happy holiday season. fareed zakaria "gps" is next for our viewers here in the united states. >>> this is "gps" the global public square. welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. on the show today, we'll move past the fiscal cliff and talk about the real challenges to the economy. i will talk to the chief economic adviser of the romney campaign and president obama's former budget czar peter orzack, among others. >>> also, let me tell you about the biggest success story in latin america. it's not brazil. much closer to home. then, as the world watches the arab world struggle with democracy, we'll take a look at the problem from an unusual perspective, upside down. how does a country turn away from democracy as eastern europe did 50
brown is next. dagen: some of today's winners on this shortened trading session. they spoke. almost $27 a share. ♪ dennis: the blame for the fiscal cliff gridlock falls squarely on the side of both politicians from the democratic and republican side. john, what do you think? >> i think we can fix it. i do not think we will for a long time. both parties are to blame. i think president obama has been prepared to go over the cliff for a long time. he started the negotiations putting a lot of red lines down and demanding more. it is created by both the democrats and republicans. i think we will maybe get a small deal, but the really big can will be kicked down the road to further impoverished american citizens, working people, to finance big and ever intrusive government. the only answer, in my opinion, is to have strict term minutes for u.s. politicians. it used to be that politics was a vocation. now it has turned into a career. they are most interested in getting reelected so they continue their career. they forget the nation. it is very apparent in our country. in america, it has gone
in the store. jackie browne at 26 with no expression on his face said he could get some guns. i finished the book at home and one sitting and felt like i had been set free. hying begins moved the story almost entirely with dialogue to conversations of cops and criminals. their voices establishing the style and driving. i stopped trying to tell what was going on in my books and began to show. i began to show it from the pointing of view and voices of characters bad guys and good ones. the way george used his ear to tell what his people were up to. five years later "the new york times" said i often cannot resist a set piece. with a crazy is kind of scat logical poetry. that's pretty much how i learned to write in a style. i lifted from higgins but changed enough until it became my own sound. i want to thank the national book foundation for my award and recognize the executive director harrold. and his people for keeping this event on track despite sandy trying to stop us. they deserve our thanks and praise. i have to tell you -- [applause] -- i have to tell you i'm energized by the honor.
and brown before they got into power with the labor party. and the deal, the first one came along at a time when the idea of portraying very prominent public figures certainly within the realm of politics nobody did that unless it was sketch shows, comedy that kind of thing. the idea of actually depicting presidents t idea of doing that is you can't take it seriously, that kind of thing. so the idea that peter morgan who is a well respected writer but hadn't found his voice up to that point. it wasn't until he wrote "the deal" he found his groove. having him on board and having proper producers behind it gave it a seriousness and a weight that nothing had had before that was looking at these sort of people. so "the deal" was on tv. i was offered the part and no one knew what to expect. everyone expected it to fail and not work. and i think through a combination of factors, the tone was right and it was acceptable and suddenly once the tone was acceptable and people were tible accept watching a drama which includes tony blair in bed. snons you take that seriously it opens an entire new unive
anything. this year for almost six decades help kamt not in santa's sleigh but in a big, brown box. santa. i'm writing for your help. >> as with other americans, the economy is tough and times are very difficult financially. >> it's hard being homeless with nowhere it to live, no income or place to make them a christmas or buy presents. >> the holiday season is usually very tough for our family. >> making packages for the globe santa foundation. on one side we keep all the boys' toys and on the other side girls' toys am we have 30 working today. all the packages are going out to children in the boston area where the families are, you know, facing difficult times during this economy. we'll send out about 32,000 packages. >> globe santa is the holiday gift assistance program started by "the boston globe" in 1956. we've seen a number of families that are writing to globe sanity at that for the first time because they've been unemployed. the economy over the last five years has had a major impact on how many gifts we're putting together each year and that puts the stress on the donors who we
brown, and oh, there is going to be a call to bring congress back in. it was amazing to see the market on that -- >> scott brown bottom, as a lot of people were calling it. you were down more than 51. >> and it is amazing to see how our fortunes are being tied the at this point to what is going on in d.c. and every minor tweet or post or headline or what not, at the end of the day, it was four straight losing sessions for the dow, nasdaq, as well as the s&p 500. certainly something we have to watch. in the meantime, the clock is not only ticking for the fiscal cliff, but time is running out to avoid a strike at ports in massachusetts and texas, that could affect containers to and from the u.s. from reaching their destination. talks are taking place in secrecy between the international long shoresman association and the u.s. maritime alliance in an effort to keep 14,000 longshoreman from walking off the job. the national association of manufacturers puts the cost of a potential strike at $1 billion a day. and this is not just finished goods, obviously, but also raw materials and parts c
with this very charming man whose eyes were alternately described as brown, blue and gray. people couldn't even describe how his eyes were. he was charming and gracious and funny and witty and totally beguiling. and her husband, who was the head of the national intelligence, comes in and says, oh, mr. jefferson, i'm sorry i'm late. and margaret bayard smith's head explodes because she just found him to be the most gracious man she'd ever metment -- met. he could disarm you that way. there is something poetic in the fact that william jefferson clinton is william jefferson clinton. [laughter] by the way, president clinton is still campaigning somewhere. [laughter] i don't know how anyone's going to tell him we voted. maybe he's already starting on the next one. i want to talk a little bit, we -- jefferson, the politician, jefferson, the renaissance man, jeff the symbol -- jefferson, the symbol, you know, secessionists wanted a piece of him in the run-up to the civil war, frank lib roosevelt -- franklin roosevelt wanted him in the runup to world war ii. he can be used in any way you need partly be
brown v board said after segregationist contrary to the constitution then you have a case that it arises out of little rock. little rock begins when a judge says we mean that. by the way the first year after brown what happened? the second year nothing. the third year they finally get around to doing something and the judge says put those children in the schools and so what happens? some of us can remember the governor of arkansas called on his militia to get them into the school and to keep them out. and the congressman down there who was a moderate arrange a meeting with eisenhower whose president and president eisenhower and its roof of a governor come he goes into the room, and he says let them do it, let them do it, i will integrate the school and he goes out of the room and tells the press the opposite. and he says the president dressed me down like a sergeant, like a general tour system assurgent. that's what happens. then eisenhower's is what do i have to do coming and he says to jimmy byrnes the governor from south carolina what do i do, and burns was a moderate democrat that re
in that beautiful, beautiful city. we're back here on "starting point." our team is ron brown, editorial director at "national journal." will cain from the blaze and the ghost of roland martin. do you need a note from the principal's office? somebody needs to explain to me what goes on with roland. he's never there. >> how do i get that freedom? >> the thing about roland, once he arrives, you won't know he was missing in the first place. alina chochl. >> count on me, ali velshi. good morning, a fight between world powers with agonized parents and children caught in the middle. russian president has banned u.s. families from adopting russian orphans. moscow says too many orphans have been abused by their new american parents. state department says it is willing to talk more about keeping the children safe. >>> fiscal cliff isn't the only threat to the u.s. economy. get a load of this. the container cliff. nearly 15,000 dockworkers from maryland to texas are threatening to strike, starting sunday, which could shut down more than a dozen key shipping ports and cripple commerce across the country. do
alabama where blake brown of our cbs affiliate is watching the tornado damage blake, good morning. >>> good morning this is the scene here in mobile, we have big trees down powerlines down, roof damage and it is just hours after the storm ripped through the city. >> volatile conditions as tornadoes toucheddown around mobile. >> i was screams and hollaring, and i was just scared to death. >> we ran into the cooler, got all of the employees in the cooler, and it came right over us. >> it blew the roofs off of homes, and on this christmas day, not even a house of worship was safe. the front wall was torn off. >> look at that tornado. >> across much of the south, many spent christmas in the dark as twisters came through. >>> tornado winds in mississippi damaged homes, and two men were killed from falling trees. >> it's a mess. >> as a funnel cloud came from mobile joe michael love shot this video from his home. >> what was that? >> that's transformers. >> i'm at my son's high school it's pretty destroyed. all of the portable classrooms are gone. >> reporter: and no s
when he came in, 60 votes in the senate, which , amount-- senator brown had won in massachusetts. but he started out with 60 and then it went down to 59 when senator kennedy and sadly died. i really admired senator kennedy as much as any man who ever served in the senate, even though we did not agree. mr. reagan had to deal with tip o'neill. that was one of the great events in washington politics because you had two extraordinarily capable politician opposing points of view. mr. reagan was poorly matched. mr. obama had nancy pelosi as speaker of the house. but hardly the same thing. host: from massachusetts on the line, democrat. caller: good morning. i have a comment and question. i am trying to find out, the situation you're in right now, why is everybody fighting about what we should do? i am gmt and i am broke every day. i'm down here with people that paid taxes and work hard every day. -- i am an emt. people don't understand that would ever happens with the fiscal cliff, people down here will survive. the republicans, this will definitely affect them in the future. i talked
brown, partner in a.t. kearney's retail practice. do we know, you have a good number for me? is 2 1/2 the number, between 3 and 4, do we know? >> the numbers are all over the place depending on what time period you're looking at and who's numbers you're looking at. most of the consensus is going to be that 2.5%, 3% range where it was forecast at the beginning of the season. >> 3% to 4% would be better. >> it looks like it's going to be closer to the 3 number. >> every year we sweat this out and there's not a whole lot of deviation from the mean most years. is there more this year because of the cliff? >> yeah, i think the cliff is partially about it. but you have to look at where we come from. beginning of the season, we saw the economy turning around. we saw construction increasing. we saw consumer confidence being up. all of a sudden then, we had the impacts of sandy, a tragedy up in newtown, connecticut, and just a lot of other factors that just put a damper on the season. >> so, it is fair to say that it started better than it ended now. >> it started better than it ended. there
>> that wraps up to date's pro- forma session. we also heard that senator scott brown had confirmed that report. white house sources are vehemently denying that. the white house saying they have not sent up any bill or any built up to capitol hill today. we expect to have a question comes up when steny hoyer talks with reporters. that is supposed to happen in about five minutes. we will have live coverage when the minority whip speaks to reporters. in the meantime, we will bring you harry reid who opened the senate session this morning with comments on the situation, and we will hear what he had to say about the fiscal cliff now. : new year's eve is fast approaching and for decades and decades the american people have watched the ball drop in times square. it's the countdown to midnight, the start of a new year. but this year, mr. president, the american people are waiting for the ball to drop but it's not going to be a good drop. because americans' taxes are approaching the wrong direction. come the first of this year, americans will have less income than they have today. if we go over the cli
. it just turns brown and does not char. >> thank you for being such a rock star engineer. i really look up to that. u.s. spoken this whole evening about inspiration and the fact that everyone that you look up to was inspired at some time. i wonder if you have your own branch whose sole purpose is to inspire youth? >> you know, i am very familiar. i was judged at the first u.s. first competition. i was invited to be a judge and the competition was just too high schools in manchester the first year. so i am very familiar and supportive of that. i gave a talk at a brand new charter school in my home town where they are starting off kids with robotics between the ages of 6 and 13. boy, are they excited to go to school. let's see. the big problem that we had that we never could even do a student summer co-op program -- the problem is, our company was so small that it was hard for us to build barriers from one project to another. everyone of them essentially is nonpublic. richard branson is program, he tells everyone about it. in almost every other program, they don't want to leave that informat
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)